Categories
Lifestyle

Escape from Technology: smart phone addiction in adults and children

It’s shocking and we don’t want to admit it – but we have a problem 

Written and researched by Monica C

The number of people addicted to high-tech devices has increased dramatically over the last few years. In addition to this worrying trend, people became more addicted to social networking sites and applications. The problem was not only observed among adults but among children as well, as devices and applications proliferate youngsters’ lives on a daily basis.

In this book, you will learn more about how this addiction has affected, and continues to affect, the lives of many people. You will also understand what computer scientists and web developers do to make sure that people keep using their products and services, regardless of the implications.   

Moreover, this book provides useful tips to help you fight addiction to social media and high-tech gadgets. You will also find guidelines to help your kids control their use of devices.  In the last chapter of this book, you will find some great apps that you can use to help you overcome your addiction to digital devices and social media. 

By the time you finish reading, you will be equipped with lessons that will help you become responsible in managing your usage of social media and high-tech devices.

Monica

Adults’ Addiction to Smartphones and Other Gadgets

Addiction to gadgets is a common problem among people today. Too much use of smartphones and other types of high-tech devices can detrimentally affect the lives of many people. This addiction causes a negative impact towards people’s health and lifestyle.

According to a recent study, 56% of Americans own smartphones. High-tech devices like computers, laptops, and tablets are now part of people’s daily lives. Some people use gadgets for entertainment while others use them mainly for communication.  

These innovative devices are designed to be used in various ways and for different purposes. They are most commonly used for communication, social interaction, entertainment, information gathering and dissemination, and content production among other uses.

People find these devices convenient for doing online banking, completing projects for school, and creating presentations for work among others. There’s no doubting the positive impact such technologies and systems have had on society, but there is a downside to this as well.

The Problem

It’s a big issue for some adults when they misplace their smartphones – I’m the same, it can be an awful feeling. When this happens, people suddenly feel lost or incomplete and are unable to accomplish any task because they rely heavily on their gadgets to do their jobs. People use their smartphones, tablets, or laptops wherever they are and whenever they want to.

They are used even in places like the cinema or the bathroom, where these gadgets are considered out-of-place or intrusive to some extent. Who hasn’t quickly whipped out their iPhones when perched on the loo to quickly check Facebook or send a text?

The addiction to smartphones and other digital devices is further underscored by stories and accounts of people taking their devices to bed with them. They surf on their tablets, read eBooks, or play games on their smartphones, supposedly to help them fall asleep, much like counting sheep.

When their smartphones beep or ring, they pick up or check for messages even as they are already dozing off. Intimate moments are not spared from this addiction as studies have reported that one out of six couples has admitted checking their phones or texting while having sex

There’s also the issue of texting while driving. In many countries, this practice is widely prohibited and for good reasons. Studies show that this practice is seven times more dangerous than drink driving. 

drink driving
Texting while driving is on the increase

Spreading Like Wildfire

All of the instances are indications that addiction to digital devices and gadgets is indeed a bigger problem than people want to admit it is. Frequently using and the seeming inseparability with these gadgets and devices is perhaps one of the most common compulsive habits observed in adults today. The sad news is that children and teenagers are likewise emulating these habits and patterns and therefore also developing a dependency or addiction. 

child-1183465_960_720

Children’s Addiction to Smartphones and Other Gadgets

Many addiction experts agree that the worst victims of gadget addiction are children and young people. Like adults, kids and teenagers use their devices all the time and are gradually becoming too attached to them. 

An independent research team in the UK interviewed over a thousand of teenagers and the respondents were asked about how they use their smartphones. Results showed that 92% of teenagers went online every day and more than half of them use their phones more than twice a day. Some of the respondents admitted to using their phones even when they were in school. Around 12% of the kids use their phones once a day, while 6% of the kids say they go online once a week. 

Most of the children nowadays grow up to having instant access to almost anything they want. Kids are given basic phones at an early age and most of them get smartphones by the time they become teenagers. Only a handful of parents put their foot down when it comes to allowing their kids to have gadgets or actively work on limiting gadget use. 

As children witness the addictive behavior from their parents, it is but natural for them to engage in the same practices as well.

Making the Addiction Worse

There are bigger problems that spring from the issue of addiction to digital devices and gadgets. If the kids are vulnerable to addiction to these devices, it is highly likely that they will also be vulnerable to other addictions. Addictive behaviour and dependency is something that goes beyond just one object of obsession.

Becoming dependent on a device at an early age can inadvertently open the door to susceptibility to addictions and dependencies later in life.

Sexting is another more recent issue that comes with digital device and social media addiction. Recently, concern has grown over the exposure of children to pornographic materials through their digital devices and the sharing of these materials through their smartphones.

Each year, the number of children exposed to explicit content grows. Kids can now access adult websites even without supervision and concern has grown over sexual or fetish content getting through the filters and on to children’s YouTube or for betting companies to target youngsters with well-known characters flashing on screens to advertise gambling games.

In a recent survey involving 1,500 teachers, around 75% of them admit that they are aware of students sharing sexual images and videos. Over the last three years, more than 2,000 children were involved in crimes linked to disturbing images. Many teenagers describe sexting as “normal.”

Most young girls think that sending naked pictures to someone is a common occurrence among their peer group. They say that it only becomes a problem if their parents find out. 

Kids also become more attached to their digital devices when they get addicted to playing mobile games. What’s worse is that it’s actually the parents who are often to blame for this kind of addiction. They use digital devices as surrogate or virtual nannies to keep the kids from becoming too rowdy, noisy, or fussy.

They think that for as long as their kids are preoccupied with their games on their devices, they are less likely to get into mischief or make a mess. What parents sometimes do not realize is that they are encouraging and supporting addictive behavior in their children. 

Mandy Saligari, an addiction expert, said that parents tend to overlook the addictive nature of high-tech devices. She notes that giving a tablet or a smartphone to a child is like giving him or her a gram of coke or a glass of wine.

She observes that many parents pay more attention to keeping their children away from alcohol and drugs rather than to keeping them from using their gadgets too much. They are failing to see that it’s the same addictive behaviour regardless if it’s alcohol and drugs or digital devices and social media.  

ipad-1721500_960_720

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. 

Continue the conversation by sending an email to escapersmedia@gmail.com with your thoughts.

Categories
Lifestyle

Escape the Rat Race to live in a van

Life got too hectic for Dusty so he grabbed some wheels and took to the road

Our man Peter R hitched a ride to see how he did it

Dusty Apostle (not his real surname you’ll be surprised to hear) is between the stage of consuming a hearty breakfast and facing the reality that there are pots and pans to be washed. The incessant waves of Covid-19 are meddling with many people’s daily routines but he is managing to remain focused on other things.

Having worked in an office for 11 years in financial services -often stuck in the British version of a cubicle existance- Dusty knows there is more to life than a 9-5 grind.

He has been living in a used Autotrail Mohican van for the last few months and is feeling motivated.

“This van is perfect because it offers me all the comforts and facitilies I need, all under one roof,” he says. “I have everything I need in here, like a pullout bed, cooking equipment, storage for some books and clothes. My fold-up bike is tucked away nice and handy as well.”

carrying a bicycle
Bicycles are practical for getting around quickly

Life in a business park grew stale

The sparse, naturally cramped, environment is a far cry from where Dusty once spent his days, in a business park on the outskirts of London. With thousands of workers buzzing like flies around the complex all day, there was little time for relaxation or peace and quiet in that location.

As the interest in online financial services and robo investing grew, Dusty’s job regularly changed. Longer hours, more pressure and a “harder working culture” as was envisioned at the time by a new CEO. Many of his co-workers lapped it up, eyeing new opportunities and fresh challenges.

One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important

Bertrand Russell

For Dusty, there was little more than a sense of dread at what was to come. “The general vibe was of excitement at all the money everyone was going to make and all the stuff they would buy,” he says. “Nobody stopped to consider the extra hours and added stresses that would come with the changes.”

Society obsesses over materialism and owning ‘stuff’

If Dusty was going to escape from this cycle of materalism and an endless striving to own and buy more items, he would have to plan a great escape. Living in a van was appealing but not his first consideration. Backpacking, working abroad or, like one of our recent intervieweees Margaret, setting up on a country homestead were also alluring options.

“I was always passionate about self sufficiency and looking after my own interests, so jumping into something completely new was a possibility. I thought about seasteading first, or some other kind of water-based activity. But it was so bloody cold here in the UK that I was worried about falling overboard in the middle of winter!”

Despite doing his research and constantly scanning the internet for options, nothing really happened until Dusty reached a low point in the office. Sitting filing paperwork at nearly midnight, as the team scurried to close on a lucrative deal, he realised it was time to act.

“It pretty much became now or never,” he recalls. “I realised that I would have to do something radical – jump without a parachute I suppose- and hopefully land on my feet.

“I actually received a lot of support from my colleagues, which was both surprising and very reassuring. I expected a few to say I was nuts but that wasn’t really the case. One or two said they wished they could do the same. Thinking back now I would tell them they can.”

living on a boat
Life on a boat has its drawbacks

Living in a van was the most appealing choice

Dusty made two life-changing decisions: he handed in his notice and bought a used camper van. By now he had done plenty of additional studying into multiple lifestyle choices, and van dwelling seemed like an appealing option.

“Living in a van appealed to me because it was cheap to run compared to living in a house or flat and it was on the road so I would be able to move about as I please, from location to location, finding places that suited me.”

Dusty went about contacting some more well established road campaigners and grabbing as many practical tips as he could. Nothing, however, could prepare him for some of the trials and tribulations that have occurred since he first took to running the dual carriage ways of the UK and beyond.

“From about October on it can get a bit chilly. I’ve had to invest in a few pairs of woolly socks, thick vests and a furry hot water bottle. It’s weird going to sleep in a beanie hat but it has to be done.”

Dusty might be a late starter but he has swiftly adapted to living in a van. Of course there have been some hairy moments along the way.

“Finding a good, safe spot to park for the evening can be difficult sometimes. I parked up in an industrial estate once and woke up the next morning to the sound of crashing and banging all around. I thought I was being towed away onto the back of a truck! Turns out I had stopped next to some bins and they were getting emptied at like 7am. It was quite literally a wake up call though. I take a closer eye to my surroundings when settling down for the evening.”

Dusty decided not to document his journey online

Now with over a year of experience under his belt, Dusty has decided against blogging or recording his journey in any way on social media. He has nothing negative to say abut those who do but it is just not for him and it took me a while and the help of a mutual friend to persuade him to agree to this interview.

“I’m sure I could write down a few stories and tips for other people thinking about doing this but a lot of it is already out there. Bloggers and podcasters are doing a better job than I could.”

Does he keep in touch with anyone still grinding away in the corporate rat race?

“One or two folks I would email from time-to-time. I don’t even have a smartphone or anything, just a top-up mobile in case of emergencies. I dip in to a Starbucks or the library to check emails.”

Dusty’s dream to escape the rat race has been realised and he has little idea of where he’ll end up next. That said, there is one place he won’t be returning to anytime soon…

“No chance you’ll find me in an office ever again!” he laughs. “If the van life gets too much I’ll pick litter off the streets first and live in a tent before you catch me sitting at a desk, punching numbers into a computer.”

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. 

Continue the conversation by sending an email to escapersmedia@gmail.com with your thoughts.

Categories
Lifestyle

Small Shelter: Living in a Tiny House

Thinking big, living small. More people are rejecting the familiar trappings of society and voluntarily down size

Escapers contributor Swetha L dissects a paper on the tiny house movement and the motivations behind its growth. We recently looked over the rise in digital nomads. This time it’s something a little different.

Dreaming big and living small: Examining motivations and satisfaction in tiny house living by Lauren M Boeckermann, Andrew T Kaczynski, Sarah B King

Section 1 – Introduction

The impetus for the shift towards tiny houses comes from three essential factors:

  • The average housing cost, adjusted for inflation, has increased by 9 times when compared to 1970s while the real incomes of people have remain unchanged
  • The average size of the household has increased from 1660 sq.ft in 1973to 2596 sq.ft in 2013 while the average size of the family has declined from 3.67 members in 1940 to 2.62 members in 2005. This means that the average square foot of housing per person has increased from 290 sq.ft in 1950 to 893 sq.ft in 2003
  • The environmental impact of urbanisation has increased by 50% as low density sub urban growth took place. There is increased need for energy and the storm water runoff has also increased due to increased use of concrete.

As a result of these factors, some people have begun to evaluate their needs and considered living in time homes.

apartment block
Housing costs are rising and good accommodation is at a premium

There are several factors associated with housing satisfaction. The following list of factors have been found to have a positive influence on the housing satisfaction of the residents.

Increase in housing cost and percentage share of income spent on housing.

Length of residence.

Adequacy of housing size, surrounding environment and green space.

Ownership of the house.

Housing satisfaction is in turn related to the life satisfaction and happiness of individuals.

The Tiny House movement is getting stronger

The tiny house movement began in 2002 and gained momentum with the establishment of the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company and Small House Society. These societies aimed to provide high quality living spaces to individuals who wanted to intentionally reduce the size of their homes.

There is no standard measure for a tiny home and they generally ranged between 70 sq.ft to 300 sq.ft. The cost and complexity of the tiny house varied while all included space for sleeping, bathing, storage and cooking.

The kinds of people who chose to live in tiny houses were diverse. Research has been able to identify several niche populations such as students, retired seniors and young adults as choosing to live in tiny houses.

Some wealthy individuals who strongly believe in downsizing also choose to live in tiny homes. Several organisations are using transportable small homes for sheltering the homeless in Wisconsin and Oregon.

The reasons for choosing tiny living are also diverse. A study by Mutter (2013) has identified 6 important motivations.

Tiny houses may have their appeal, but they’re not the right fit for everyone. There are a few things to consider before plunging into such a small space.

Hillary Hoffower, Business Insider

Leading a simpler life: Reduce consumerist culture that is typical of American society.

Reduce environmental impact: Decrease carbon footprint by using recycled materials, alternative sources of energy, collection of rain water and so on.

Cost: Enable people to own houses at relatively low costs.

Flexibility and freedom: People can move their houses where ever they want to.

Sense of community.

Customisation potential.

shopping consumption
More people are re evaluating their consumption lifestyles

Tiny House Research Question

To examine the motivations of people to live in tiny houses using quantitative measures on a large sample.

To test the relationship between motivations and the satisfaction derived from living tiny after accounting for factors like size, cost, duration and so on.

To identify population who are more willing to live in tiny homes.

To find the key factors behind the growing trend of tiny houses.

Research Paper Method

The Tiny House Community Survey was developed for the purpose of this study with 57 items divided into four parts.

Demographic details- age, race and ethnicity, education and annual household income.

House characteristics- size, current living arrangement, length of residence, cost, ownership and mobility of the house.

Motivations- simplicity, sustainability and environmental factors, cost, freedom and mobility, sense of community, interest in design and empowerment were measured on a 5 point scale.

Satisfaction captured using a 5 point scale.

These factors were dichotomized to run a logistic regression.

sustainable growing
Sustainability is a concern

Section 2 – Sample Evidence

64 respondents from USA (61), New Zealand (1), Canada (1), Australia (1).

Permitted for only one response per household to ensure diversity of the sample.

Not restricted to a particular country.

Data Collection

Social Media posts on Facebook to reach out to community pages of tiny home dwellers.

Outreach to blogs related to tiny living and minimalism to reach potential tiny home dwellers.

Instagram page on tiny house community survey to directly reach out to tiny home dwellers.

Participants given a chance to win either one of the two gift cards for their participation in the survey.

Data Analysis

Logistic regression to find association between motivations for living in tiny houses with housing satisfaction after accounting for other house and individual characteristics.

Research Results

Demographic characteristics.

Sex: Female (78%), Male (20%).

Age: Young (59%), Old (41%).

Race: White (96%), Biracial (4%) – Hispanic (9%), Non-Hispanic (91%).

Education: 2 year degree or less (41%) 4 year degree or more (60%).

Income: $59999 or less (59%), $60000 or more (41%).

Section 3 – Tiny House Characteristics

Size: up to 199 sq.ft (32%), 200 to 799 sq.ft (68%).

Ownership: Owned (71%), not owned (29%).

Length of residence: less than a year (49%), more than a year (51%).

Mobility: Yes (89%), no (11%).

Residents: Single (45%), Partner (33%), Family (22%).

Total Cost: $39999 or less (53%), $40000 or more (47%).

Motivations: Cost, Simplicity and Freedom were the top motivations

Cost: High (72%), Low (28%).

Simplicity: High (66%), Low (34%).

Freedom and mobility: High (52%), Low (48%).

Environmental Impact: High (50%) Low (50%).

Interest in Design: High (37%), Low (63%).

Empowerment: High (24%), Low (76%).

Sense of Community: High (22%), Low (78%).

Bivariate Relationships

Unadjusted odds ratio showed that individuals who were highly motivated by simplicity for adopt tiny living were more likely to be satisfied with their housing status. Other motivations were found to be insignificant.

Adjusted odds ratio estimated after accounting for other influencing variables showed that the desire to live life in a simple manner was the only factor associated with tiny house satisfaction.

Age was the only demographic measure associated with satisfaction as older people were more likely to be satisfied than younger people with tiny houses. Other demographic and house related characteristics were found to be insignificant.

tiny house shacks
Having a nice view is always a bonus

Section 3 – Tiny House Discussion Points and Concluding Remarks

A simplified lifestyle was found to be the only significant motivation for housing satisfaction for individuals who lived in tiny houses. The possible reason for this significance is because of the fact that a small house constraints an individual from buying more things.

They will have to restrict themselves with the basic of possessions. This would also mean decreased expenses focusing on gaining experiences not consumerist goods. The results of this study are consistent with the other studies which have found that residents take into consideration the fit between their self-congruity and the perceived image of the house along with the functional aspects of the house.

Though other studies  have shown that satisfaction is associated with the demographic characteristics but this study found age to be the only significant variable.

Tiny House Limitations for Rat Race escapers

Sample homogeneity reducing the generalizability of the results.

Sample restricted to those who engage in the online community.

Cross-sectional design can only help identify associations and not causal relationships.

senior citizens
This lifestyle attracts both young and old – Senior Safety Advice

Tiny House Living Conclusions

Limited literature in the area though it is of growing concern.

Study helps understand the reason for people’s choice to downsize.

Providing information and awareness is required to overcome the challenges of lack of information, legal concerns and financing opportunities.

Desire for simplicity is the key factor for satisfaction in living in a tiny house.

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. 

Continue the conversation by sending an email to escapersmedia@gmail.com with your thoughts.

Categories
Lifestyle

Quitting the Rat Race: How one woman escaped her 9 to 5 job

Margaret needed to escape the grind so she took action

By Peter R

On a roasting Friday afternoon in rural England, while the trees baked and the only sound is that of a distant stream, Margaret is busy pruning an unruly hedgerow.

Categories
Lifestyle

Freeganism as a way of life

There are many different reasons why people escape to a freegan lifestyle

By Monica C

This is part three. Find part two here.

Freeganism can be labelled as a subculture of people. In this subculture, there are different types of freegans who are classified according to their motivations to adapt to the freegan lifestyle.

The feeling of remorse for wasted food and products.

They are aware of how much food is wasted each year. They know that there is mass waste of clothes, gadgets, and furniture all bought in order to keep up with the recent trends and fashion. With that in mind, freegans take advantage of the opportunity to find useful items in the bins and dumpsters.

Love for the animals and environment.

Freegans are aware of the toxins and negative effects of the by-products used by a company. They also know how much non-biodegradable things are thrown away by people who are not aware of their negative effects. They know that there are abused animals in every fur and wool products.

For these reasons they adopt a freegan lifestyle with an aim of saving the environment. They want to eliminate waste and the dangers of some products by scouting the dumpster and reusing or recycling whatever they can find. They also don’t want to subscribe to purchase of products that cause the abuse of some animals.

They are against consumerism and capitalism.

They are the real freegans because they believe strongly that they know the real principles behind freeganism and who the real culprit is. Because of this they avoid everything that can make the capitalists stronger. They achieve this by not buying their products, insulting them by getting these products from a dumpster for free, proving to them that they can live without buying their products, or sometimes by shoplifting (this is the exception not the rule).

They are just extremely frugal.

Some people are just extremely frugal. They adapt to the freegan lifestyle for personal reasons. They just want to save lots of money, because it is an obvious fact that you can save a lot when you dumpster dive.

Aside from these common motivators for adopting a freegan lifestyle there are other various reasons. Some are encouraged by friends who are freegans while others just hang out with other freegans, because there are various events and activities held in freegan communities.

How to be a real freegan?

The first and the most important thing that you have to do is to ask yourself, “What are you fighting for?” or “Why do you want to become a part of a community who are willing to face the prejudice of the society?”

Although it may seem easy to adapt to a freegan lifestyle, the difficult parts are mainly the battles that you will have to face in your everyday life. To become a serious freegan, there are a lot of sacrifices that you will have to make. These include your pride and career – that’s if you are a capitalist or you working for a capitalist.

What’s important is that you are prepared and you have the confidence and bravery to face these battles. These battles include the fight against capitalism and consumerism. That’s why if you have this so-called career that includes working for a capitalist, or being a capitalist yourself, you may want to say goodbye to it. Not to mention the personal battles against the prejudice and discrimination of closed-minded people who can’t even figure out the difference between a freegan and a bum.

If you think you are ready to face life as a freegan, here are some important practices you have to apply:

Work less

As was mentioned before, time is the most valuable thing for a freegan. A freegan devotes most of his or her time to family, friends and community. He devotes most of his time taking actions against consumerism and capitalism. He also devotes his time teaching the others on how to create something good out of trash.

Squat or couchsurf

A freegan believes that lands should be publicly shared. That is why he doesn’t bother paying for a rent or mortgage. He would squat or couch surf instead or live in a communal area.

He would squat in an abandoned house to provide housing for those people who want it, or he will use the place to provide education for the community. On the other hand, couch surfing is also encouraged to all the freegans worldwide, because this is a way to build stronger relationships between likeminded individuals.

Waste Reclamation

This is a trademark of a freegan. He does it to eliminate the wasted stuff and food items. Many hungry people in the world are living in poverty. That’s why freegans try to extend their help by saving the foods and stuff from a dumpster and sharing these to the others for free.

Gardening and farming

Freegans are against GMOs and corporate food production systems. That’s why they create their own food by planting fruits, vegetables and herbs.

They minimize waste

They organize activities like free markets and free stores. During these events, you can swap the things that don’t seem useful for you, but can still be used by others. You can also swap your recycled stuff through internet-based swapping sites.

They don’t own a car

To get from one place to another, a freegan hitchhikes or uses the train or a bike because they know that owning a car will only contribute to pollution. In addition, they are fully aware that buying a car is a form of subscription to consumerism. This said, a documentary aired in the UK some years ago showed freegans driving around in a camper van using doctored vegetable oil as fuel!

The perks of being a freegan

It is a fact that there’s a movement or even an ideology behind freeganism and anyone who practices it can enjoy other benefits including the following:

Free food, house, furniture and other stuff

Your food and your housing is always free. You can find food in a dumpster or you can pick it from your garden. You don’t need to pay for rent or a mortgage because you have an abandoned house as your home, or you can find a place to stay with likeminded people. The same goes to the other things that you can find in a dumpster. If you’re lucky enough, you may even find something unexpectedly beautiful.

You don’t have to please anybody

You don’t have to follow any rules. You do not have any bosses to please. You don’t have any irate customers to deal with.

More friends

Freegans are social people. They promote couch surfing and gathering events to meet up with the other freegans in different parts of the world.

References for all three articles

Freegan.info. (n.d.). Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://freegan.info/

Blood Diamonds are still a reality. (n.d.). Retrieved April 24, 2016, from https://www.amnesty.ie/news/blood-diamonds-are-still-reality

Global Exchange. (n.d.). A How-To Guide That Shows What You Can Do to Promote Fair Trade for Cocoa Farmers. 2017 Mission Street, Suite 303, San Francisco, CA., from http://www.globalexchange.org/sites/default/files/ChocolateActionPack.pdf

Lindeman, S. (n.d.). Freegans: The Refined Art of Dumpster Diving. Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://www.utne.com/mind-and-body/freegans-dumpster-diving-zm0z12sozlin.aspx

Smithers, R. (2013, January 10). Almost half of the world’s food thrown away, report finds. Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jan/10/half-world-food-waste

The Chinese Fur Industry. (n.d.). Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/fur/chinese-fur-industry/

The Wool Industry. (n.d.). Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/wool-industry/

Wilson, S. (n.d.). The Story of Cascade Locks, and The Story of Nestlé. Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://storyofstuff.org/blog/the-story-of-nestle/

Further Reading and viewing

Further reading materials and videos can be found below.

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. Give us a shout on Twitter us @EscapersMedia.

Categories
Lifestyle

Escaping to freeganism: philosophies, ethics and principles

Delving further in to the freegan movement and their desire to escape the shackles of conventional society

By Monica C

This is part 2. Click here to find part one.

What is the freegan vision?

Freegans look at current society and see victims of capitalism, and people functioning as if profits and consumerism are inherently good things. In a freegan’s point of view, these are not good things, but instead represent the causes of the problems in wider society.

Because of capitalism (amongst many other things, it’s not the sole cause), inequality between people exists; animals are treated not as living creatures but as machines and the Earth is filled with pollutants caused by the companies’ by-products. For the freegans, the root of all the self-destructing factors in the society is capitalism.

For them, if capitalism continues to fool the society of its “benefits,” they fear that in the near future, all forests will be cleared (see the excessive logging in Brazil for example), there will be no clean air to breathe, no clean water to drink and no sustainable food sources to eat.

Why do freegans blame capitalism for all the bad things that are happening in the society?

Some people say that capitalism doesn’t exist nowadays, and if it does, it’s already controlled by different laws. Others say that good capitalism in the modern society has to exist, because it creates different roles for everyone, not to mention the product innovations and concept of ownership.

In the eyes of a freegan, capitalism is the root of almost all of the problems in the society. It is the reason why social classes exist and why some people dream of working in a better profession and gaining more profitable employment. But it is the reason for the continuous destruction of the Earth’s biosphere.

The following are some of the societal problems caused by capitalism and consumerism, which gave rise to the freeganism movement.

poverty

Do freegans see capitalism as the cause of discrimination

In the workplace

Everyday, you have to work hard for almost 6-8 hours per day. You have the most tedious and difficult job, but at the end of the day, what you’ll find out is that all of your hardships and effort are just equivalent to an amount of money which is often still not enough to provide for the needs of your family.

To make it worse, your superiors don’t really have to do much about anything. They are just there to supervise you. They sit in their office, signing off jobs and follow a decision-making process, but they still make more money than you do. You cannot complain about it because they’re the owners. They’re the ones who are paying you. You are just there to follow and and make them richer.

In educational attainment

In current times the primary aim of the existence of schools is not to promote true education but train the children on how to be better slaves for capitalists.

Nowadays, you’ll hear most parents telling their children to do their best at school. They tell them to compete with their classmates and other schoolers to get a better job in the future. You won’t hear the parents say that they have to go to school to learn something interesting and new, so they can become whoever they want to become.  

This misconception about school is rooted from the unequal opportunities of people based on educational attainment. Those people who have graduated with a degree have a greater opportunity to get a better job.

If you’re a college graduate and you are compared to an undergrad, you will always have the edge whether you learned something from college or not. As long as you have this piece of paper called diploma, you are welcome in the HR’s office to get your interview. However, if you are the undergrad, there are less opportunities for you no matter how experienced or smart you are.

In race

Capitalism is the reason why job stereotyping among races, colour, and gender exists. Without capitalism, there’ll be no inferior or superior countries. There’ll be no need for human resource exportation and everyone will be treated equally.

Capitalism takes charge of people’s most important commodity

For the freegans, time is the most valuable commodity. Humans have only one life to live and it’s short. Because of capitalism, this valuable commodity is taken away from them.  

Your boss also has a lot of control over the majority of your time. Imagine the fact that you spend most of the time working for them while you are awake. This is the harsh truth that you cannot resist when you choose to work for them, because resisting their orders and not following the rules that they’ve set at work may cause you to get fired.

Capitalism destroys the environment and the welfare of animals.

Freegans believe that all companies are responsible for the environmental destruction. Waste materials are inevitable by-products, when a company produces something. These waste materials can destroy the Earth’s biosphere.

It doesn’t matter if these companies claim to be externalists or socially responsible

Escapers

Freegans don’t believe these kinds of marketing campaigns because not everyone is 100 per cent sure that their products are 100 per cent eco-friendly.

For example, the eco-friendly cars. Freegans don’t believe that these “eco-friendly” cars are 100 per cent eco-friendly. How about their paint and other components? What about the machineries and other equipment used in making this product? What about its by-products?

Capitalism creates a lot of waste

Capitalism is the reason that fads exist. Because of the marketing campaigns and frequent innovations on different products, people have this urge to be “in” or buy what the marketing campaign has told them to buy. Because of this, a lot of usable or edible products are thrown away.

Companies are getting richer and richer, while consumers are wasting more commodities, money and other resources.

Capitalism takes possession of the things meant to be shared.

The illusion of “right” perceived by most people nowadays is the result of the “buy it to own it” concept. According to them, this is the way to settle the dispute about ownership among people.  

The funny thing is that people still have this dispute, even in the presence of titles, receipts and certifications. It is also ironic that natural resources, such as water, forest, land, trees, and animals, are naturally made and humans made no contribution in their existence. In fact, these things were already there even before the humans appeared on Earth. So do humans have this real right to take possession of these things?

Capitalism fools society in view of what is valuable or not.

The illusion of what is valuable and what is not is dictated to the society by various marketing campaigns. TV commercials, radio and magazine ads and other marketing collaterals designed to teach the consumers what to believe.

Different marketing strategies are made to manipulate the biased tendencies of the brain. In the modern marketing strategy, emotions are manipulated to get the people to buy an endorsed product.

The products are commonly bought, not because of their real value, but because of what the marketing campaign has told them.

For this reason, most people in society discard and neglect all the wasted products because they think that these are not valuable at all. What the marketing campaign says to be valuable is mostly what is only valuable for them.

Because of this illusion, people forget that there are good things that they can find in the dumpster. In fact, if you are creative enough, and you know that there are valuable things in the trash, you can still make something new, and something beautiful and important.    

Statistics and facts

Some people oppose the principles and morals practiced by the freegans. They think that freegans tend to overreact to the problems of the current society. The opponents also believe that freegans can’t make any effective changes in society and they are just risking their health because of their lifestyle.

People naturally have different beliefs and they have their own way of dealing with the societal problems. However, there are proven statistics and facts that can prove the self-destructing effects of capitalism and most importanlty over-consumption. It also proves that freegans are just people who are aware of the possible long-term effects of materialism and consumption and they are just taking a serious action to prevent it before it gets too late.

Proof that capitalist exploitation still exists

According to the Storyofstuff.org, the main source of income of most people in Cascade Lock, Oregon is agriculture. The residents were sharing the water of the publicly-owned water source called Oxbow Springs.  

However, in 2007, Nestlé came to Cascade Lock to deal for the privatization of Oxbow Springs. Nestle were planning to make bottled water beverages out of the spring’s water and sell them back to people. They in return promised to open 50 new jobs to people.

Proof of hunger

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, in 2013 there were more than 49 million of Americans who have been struggling to find food to eat. Also, in 2013, there were 21.5 million children who received free or reduced-price lunches from the National School Lunch Program.

Approximately 50 per cent of these children received free or reduced price breakfast from the School Breakfast Program. Only 2.4 million of these children received free or reduced price food from the Summer Food Service Program during summer months.

Proof about food waste

According to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in UK, there is approximately two billion tonnes, or almost half of the food produced in the world, that never makes it on the table each year. The IMechE says that it is all because of the unnecessary sell-by dates, buy one-get one free promotional strategies, poor storage facilities, engineering and agricultural practices, and consumers’ demand for cosmetically perfect food.

The United Nations predicted that by the end of the century, there will be an extra three billion people to feed and the demand for food and other resources is continuously growing. That’s why it is important to deal with this problem about food waste.

Examples of abuse behind products

Diamonds

According to Amnesty International around 3.7 million people died in Africa during the three-year civil war. This is all because of the illegal trade of diamonds that cost billions of dollars all to provide arms for rebels and warlords.

Wools

According to PETA, sheep are treated as wool-producing machines and not as living creatures. Because of the huge market for wool, sheep are the ones that are abused.

Shearers are paid per volume, and not per hour, that’s why they are encouraged to work as fast as they can, even if it harms the sheep. Because of this fast-paced work, the shearers can inevitably cut the sheeps’ skin. Most shearers just leave the sheeps’ wound as it is, and some sew it without using any painkillers. Aside from that, others report certain cases of sheep maltreatment including kicking, punching, hitting, and other forms of abuse.   

In Australia, there’s a breed of sheep cultured specifically for its capability to produce a thick wool due to its wrinkly skin. The breed of this sheep is called merino. The ranchers commonly let the wool grow without considering its effects on the sheep during the hot months. Aside from that, its thick wool can collect some of the sheep’s waste, attracting a breeding haven for flies, especially in the wrinkly area of the skin, where the moisture commonly collects. Because of this, there are merinos that are eaten alive by maggots.

To face this problem, some ranchers apply a deadly procedure on lambs that are as young as two to eight weeks old. The lambs are forced to endure the procedure, which prevents their skin from wrinkling. This procedure is called molesing. This method is applied by restraining a lamb’s legs and forcing it to its back. After that, the rancher will cut a huge chunk of skin on the lambs backside without any painkillers. This is the main reason behind the death of many lambs even before they reach their eighth week.

Cocoa

According to the globalexchange.org, West Africa has been the main source of cocoa in 60 years. It comprises the 67 per cent of the world’s total production of cocoa.

America is the largest consumer of cocoa. Americans spent a total of $13 billion dollars on chocolate and ate 3.3 billion pounds of it in 2001.

Behind the sweet, delicious and addictive taste of chocolate, there’s a horrible labor force behind it. The low global market value of chocolate has been owed to the children who are forced to work in cocoa plantations. These children are forced to complete hazardous daily tasks without any protection, such as using machetes and pesticides.

According to the US State Department, there have been 15,000 children who were sold to work in plantations of cocoa, coffee and cotton in the Ivory Coast, the greatest producer of cocoa. Also, according to UNICEF and IITA, the Ivory Coast farmers have been using child slaves who came from the neighboring countries such as Burkina Faso, Togo, Mali and Benin.

Also, according to the IITA, 60 per cent of children who are working in cocoa plantations have never been into school.

Fur

China has been the greatest exporter of fur in the world, and their consumer is the United States. Why? It is because certain animal abuses are not illegal in China.

According to PETA, there are even fur farms in China that operate legally to exploit and abuse the animals in unimaginable and barbaric ways. The animals that you can find here include dogs, cats, rabbits, foxes and other animals. These animals are commonly placed in a wired cage wherein they are exposed to the scorching sun and heavy rainfalls.

To make it even worse, when it’s time to “harvest,” the fur farmers will pull the animals aggressively from their cages, throw them onto the ground and hit them with a bludgeon.

It doesn’t end there just yet. According to the undercover investigators from Swiss Animal Protection / EAST International, the fur farmers would hang them by their legs or tail and would begin skinning them. It is the worst part for the animals that survived the bludgeon, because they are skinned alive. After this process, they will be thrown into the pile of skinless and bloody animals that have gone before them.

It seems like doing this kind of stuff is just a part of everyday life in China, because you’ll find more fur farms and animal market in other places, wherein you’ll see domestic animals, such as dogs and cats hanged and bleeding to death.

These are just some of the examples of abuse behind every product. It will take more than a thousand-page book to expose all the wrongdoings and abuse of brands and products and we are just using these examples to highlight the backdrop of abuses that shape the ethics and philosophies of the freegan movement.

It is because the freegans believe that even though a product appears to be legally produced and loved by loyal customers, there are still hints of abuse and harm behind it.

For example, a plastic bag is a product that is widely accepted by society, but is it good for the environment? A glass of Coca Cola is a product legally produced and widely accepted, but is it good for your body? The same goes with cigarettes, alcohol, and more.

The only foods or goods that are accepted by the freegans are those that are naturally harvested and are wasted away by some people. They reuse and recycle whatever they can find useful to eliminate the harmful effects of plastics and other non-biodegradable materials in the environment.

Freegans’ solution to the effects of consumerism and capitalism

The freegans’ aim to battle against capitalism by living a simple life. They want the kind of society which is almost the same as primitive times when our ancestors were living a simple life and were just happy with what they had and what they could acquire, sustainably from the environment.

The freegans do not like people to take full control of the environment and use it to benefit only them. They just want to let the environment provide for them as naturally as it used to during the ancient times.

For this reason, they don’t let capitalism dictate the way they have to live. They live by not letting the “bosses” enslave them because they believe that their motives are for profits and not for the good of society. They don’t buy the goods that will only profit the capitalists and enslave the poor.

They have to live in a simple way by not subscribing to the illusion of  a “good life,” or material existence that the capitalists dictate them. They have to do it to save the environment and the society. They do it by saving the goods that the other people see as trash. They have to live a simple and happy life to teach the others about freeganism and the creative ways of doing it.

They want to show to everyone that the world is a beautiful place to live. They want to prove to people that it is possible to feel happier and be richer by seeing others’ perspectives and by seeing the opposite of what every marketing collateral tells them is beautiful and desirable. They want to show the world that people can still survive without over consuming and that they can be happy with all the things that the environment can naturally give them.

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. Give us a shout on Twitter us @EscapersMedia.

Categories
Lifestyle

Freeganism: Dumpster Diving and Reclaiming Waste

Exploring Freeganism as a practise and philosophy. How and why do freegans escape from society?

Written and researched by Monica C

What is Freeganism?

How is your everyday lifestyle? Do you wake up in the morning to force yourself to do a daily routine for those people you’re working for? Do you have to spend a lot of cash just to have something on your table? Do you always have to pay for debt and interest after buying “stuff” in grocery stores and shopping malls?

Freegans, the ones who practice a freeganism lifestyle, don’t have to do those things. Their daily routines don’t include going to work or visiting stores and supermarkets.

They enjoy a simple, yet different lifestyle. They live without feeling the need to work for somebody, but they always have food on the table and they always acquire everything that they need. The interesting part is they get of there things for free. They are creative people who know how to turn trash into gold.

Freegans are dumpster divers who scout for furniture, appliances, food or anything that has been discarded by other members of society. This is the way they choose to live because they don’t subscribe to consumerism and capitalism.

  1. What freeganism is not – challenging myths and stereotypes
  2. Freegans, slackers, freeloaders, and bums are the same.

Some people go by the above notion when questioned on their understanding of this grouping. They are still unaware of the freeganism movement, which is the main reason they often consider bums, freeloaders and freegans as the same entity. Also, some people find freeganism as a good excuse to slack off. Note, however, that freeganism is different from bumming or slacking.

Bums are homeless and jobless. Some view the term bum in itself as a derogatory or demeaning term but we will use it here for the purpose of clarity and explanation. For so-called bums, not having a job is not a choice – well, some choose not to work, but it’s commonly because of harrowing personal reasons. The dumpster diving lifestyle is not their choice but it’s mainly because of the lack of money.

There is a distinction between freegans and the homeless

You may see a freegan scouting for food or stuff in a dumpster like a bum does. You may say that like a bum, some freegans choose not to work a 40-60-hour/week job, but there’s a meaningful reason behind this kind of lifestyle – something that’s beyond personal problems or unavoidable circumstances.

A freegan does what he does because he doesn’t want to be victimized by capitalism and consumerism. He doesn’t want to work for the bosses who are getting richer by destroying the Earth’s atmosphere, biosphere and natural resources. He (or she) is a free person who cherishes his time for something more important than being always at his best just to keep a job.

Most freegans are not homeless. They can sometimes afford to pay for mortgage or rent. Many of them are educated. In fact, some of them still choose to stay in a job. They just don’t want to subscribe to those who keep on destroying the Earth by working for them, or they just feel bad about the wasted food or products.

Freeganism and frugality are one and the same

The other misconception about freeganism is that freeganism is synonymous with frugality. It is a fact that freegans live a frugal lifestyle. However, it isn’t just about frugality. It is about finding justice for environment, wasted food or products and animal rights. They have to be frugal because their main goal is to help save society from the negative effects of capitalism.

For them, subscription to consumerism contributes to pollution, waste products and animal cruelty, that’s why they have to live a frugal lifestyle and strive to reduce consumption whenever possible. Freegans reuse and recycle whatever they find to be reusable or recyclable.

Are freegans all anarchists?

Freegans are not exclusively anarchists. Generally, there is a need for proper governance of the society to maintain peace and order. Freeganism is a separate political movement from anarchism. There are freegans who are anarchist and there are those who support a standard political hierarchy.

Some freegans are against capitalism and not in favour of the existence of a government, especially if it’s the kind of government which chooses to help and support a sovereign individual instead of looking after its people.

To wrap it up, freeganism is an anti-consumerism movement. They are not slackers, anarchists nor bums. In fact, “freegan” is a combination of two words: free and vegan – free, in a sense that they get their food out of dumpsters and vegan because most freegans abstain from eating animal products. They’re just people who want to create some change in society in their own way. None of these are absolutes and variations of philosophy do apply.

anarchists against the system
The term “anarchist” has been taken and misrepresented

How did freeganism start?

“Eww, that’s gross.” This is the common reaction of people when you say that you’ve found something edible in a dumpster and would like to eat it! Hardly surprising I suppose given how we are conditioned to live. With this common prejudice, what do you think is the reason why freeganism became a popular movement? How did it begin?

It began in the mid-1960s when an anarchist guerilla street theatre group, known as Diggers, were performing in San Francisco, California. They got their name from a 17th century group known as English Diggers. The English Diggers had this vision to free society from its obsessive consumerism and possession of private properties.

The Diggers of the mid-1960s would engage in street theatre and artistic performance. They would also cook and eat foods that came from trash, gardens and local stores – obtained by stealing. They also had the heart to share those foods through the free stores they set up and they gave them away to everyone who wanted them.

Since then, the San Francisco Diggers had made a significant contribution in political activism against food waste. Food waste issues have been at the centre of political activism to increase ecological awareness.

This was part one of a three-part series. Keep an eye out for the second part dropping soon.

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. Give us a shout on Twitter us @EscapersMedia.

Categories
Lifestyle

Escaping to a digital nomad lifestyle

Escapers worldwide are taking advantage of new opportunities to work digitally

Regular contributor Masooma B dissects a paper on the increasingly popular digital nomad lifestyle. Is it practical and beneficial to adopt a nomad lifestyle?

The Digital Nomad Lifestyle: (Remote) Work/Leisure Balance, Privilege, and Constructed Community by Beverly Yuen Thompson

Summary

The paper highlights major concepts related to the lifestyle of digital nomads. Their lifestyle has been critically seen through the lenses of privilege, inequality, community and work-leisure balance. Stebbins’ serious leisure concept and other sociological premises have also been considered.

Digital Nomadism

Digital nomads on leisure bases select their desired or preferred location and work with travelling.  Digital nomads just need a laptop and work-skills to perform their online tasks by either writing blogs, news features, social media advertising stuff, e-books, web designing, programming and much more.

Cohen et al., (2013) presented the ‘lifestyle mobility’ concept that referred to voluntary-based movement depending on the leisure aspect. It has been observed that less earning increases economic and emotional pressure and the workers tend to get more work to increase their pay.

Different perspectives to see the nomadic life

In the perspective of digital nomads, leisure and work balance was the major context. Robert Stebbins’ ‘serious leisure’ theory offers insight in to the lifestyles of digital nomads. The paper showed that their leisure significance was inverted in life as they prioritized it over workplace or office area.

Inequality-Privilege context was considered to analyze the demographics of a digital nomad, relative benefits and influences on relationships, while community perspective helped in visualizing their social position. 

Digital nomads are a type of people who use telecommunications technologies to earn a living and, more generally, conduct their life in a nomadic manner. Such workers often work remotely from foreign countries, coffee shops, public libraries, co-working spaces, or recreational vehicles

Wikipedia

Methodology

Thirty-eight detailed interviews were conducted with digital nomads. The author met them at three events

– The Lisbon 3rd 2017 DNX Conference “Digital Nomad” that held on 9th September.

– In Spain, Geneva during Retreat Digital-Nomad Girls that held on 18th September

– In, Spain, Barcelona during Conference 7in7 of experienced nomads 2017, 3 to 9 October.

Later, skype interviews were considered as a follow up to get more details.

Digital nomads use Skype to connect
Digital nomads use Skype to connect and keep in touch back home

Demographic Information

The participants were from the developed world; the majority of them were bilinguals. The age limit was 21–49 years and 80% of the sample were single or not in a marital status. They were Bachelors and Graduate degree holders while only six participants had lesser education.  Interview questions gave qualitative data that was organized, coded and arranged according to theme base.

Serious Leisure

Robert Stebbins said that mundane leisure activities such as television watching and sports etc., are different for nomads. His concept of serious leisure has six components such as perseverance, personal effort, leisure-career, identity, tangible reward, and distinctive essence or flavor in a sociological context.

He presented the alteration from professional or work-based identity to leisure pursuits as digital nomads describe remote work in the context of travel patterns that seems different from traditional tourism and relies on a basic learning concept.

However, it is difficult to distinguish them from tourists as they select the desired location, create their own lifestyle, and operate differently from the locals. 

Economic Context

In this context, it is a win-win approach. You earn with leisure and comfort. Professor Schor of Boston College carried a Pew survey and said that gig workers usually make less than $31,000 income on annual bases.

The persons who are full-time employees work part-time to earn extra as compared to those who only work as freelancers. In the current work, 29% were full-time freelancers while 42% were gig workers. 

Inequality and privilege context  

Aydogdu (2016) criticized this mode of earning and said it as technology-centered life where the real association with people and destinations is lost. The nomads also follow a capitalist approach and work hard to enhance their business gains. Nomads rarely have children and struggle to balance work and leisure.

Nomads usually move to the countries of ravaged economies to increase their currency value and local people also welcome tourists because it benefits them financially.

Nomadic Community

Although nomads leave their family and hometown, the feeling of loneliness is expressed through their writing samples. Languages and customs differences between Southeast Asian and South American countries are clear. Nomads, therefore, search other digital nomads through online platforms and nomad conferences to develop a community.

Digital nomads create their own community
Digital nomads meet wordlwide to create a sense of community

Findings

-Nomads chose a distinctive lifestyle and for this, they are often considered irresponsible by their friends and family members. However, they survive and balance perfectly when they work in the form of large groups as a community.

-In the context of Privilege –Inequality, they prefer locations which offer demographic privileges and hedonistic pleasures. Research showed that Thailand’s Chiang Mai is a rich digital nomads’ spot that has co-working sites and aesthetic value places as well. 

Bali, Vietnam, Medellin and Lisbon are some other places. It shows that they remain unconscious about local culture, language, and surrounding people and enjoy their own sense of privilege.

These differences influence their social status and Alexander said that this privileged lifestyle negatively influences their behaviors while Kaplan (1996) termed it ‘nihilistic distancing’ that brings excitement in differences as if there would be no social distance, then the locals will show no interest and exclamation for tourists.

Amna, 7in7 conference volunteer, told that she promoted charity donation for digital nomads that would be brought back to the local communities to minimize inequality and to bring social change.

Sally, who was an Arab-American said that she traveled to locations where people used to converse in Arabic language and where she could build connections. They stated that color differences gave rise to distances and inequalities and the nomads usually do not try to learn other languages.  

-Different people stated their personal experiences of social variability and they said that gradual familiarity and learning of culture can improve situations when they need to engage with locals. 

-In an employment and economic context, the participants said that they compared it to a part-time service job with less experience. Earnings gradually improved and they were able to finance their college dues in this way.

One participant was multilingual as she was familiar with more than 2 foreign languages. By using her ability, she started to find nomads and developed a network and she enabled people who spoke different languages to find more tasks through a platform.

One client was earning a large amount by software developing and websites designing and optimizing mobile apps. He said that he had worked on Disney and then on numerous high paying projects, and therefore he seemed quite satisfied with his work.

It shows that nomads can earn high by strategically improving working conditions. Although they earn less than an office job, however, there always remains a great potential to increase the earning. 

– Nomads work by following their passion for tasks and adopt it as a hobby. They find leisure in investing their time for online earning. Some adopted it for their passion of traveling and by reading nomads blogs they got information about suitable places.

One participant, “Jenny”, achieved a chemistry-related Ph.D. She had UK passport, and she had the opportunity to work in Australia, Chiang Mai, Thailand where she worked as a digital nomad in co-working spaces. 

-Co-working areas were preferred by some nomads to aid connections with people. There is the number of companies that now bring together digital nomads such as 7in7, Remote and GlobeKick that manage entrepreneurship retreats and also shape it as a business-oriented approach where the business seminar is held for motivation and also for fun purpose. 

-One participant developed Facebook Group of Girls and the online community grew with time.  She also organized meet-ups and the author attended one such meet up in Javea, Spain. The girls from Brazil, London, and Sydney, and from all over the world, joined the group.  Conferences are executed in English which shows how the Western audience is the major focus.

-Finally, long term friendships or relationships were not possible and they were using online dating sites. 

Paper Conclusion

Freedom potential is obvious when compared to a full-time, static profession. Due to less salary, they have to work constantly but in the context of Neoliberalism, this phenomenon is not just related to nomadism but rather seen in all fields.

Their downward mobility is based on income potential as they also have micro-entrepreneurial goals to earn more. From a feminist perspective it’s a male-dominated occupation and also technology-based. It led to alternative conferences for digital nomads to promote meet-ups and community development.

It’s a creative approach: creative tourism, community building, social dynamics, and fix leisure duration. They make money and enjoy their trip. It is, however, a temporary lifestyle, as after constant challenges many switch again to a traditional lifestyle. 

In the context of entrepreneurial literature, a freedom-perspective is put forth, whilst the choice of location with leisure is an option at the cost of social isolation. 

The nomads who chose to live in an expensive place in middle-class countries devoid themselves of local culture and population contexts. However, high earning potential, independence and community building supports their passion. 

— END —

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. Give us a shout on Twitter us @EscapersMedia.

Categories
Lifestyle

Walking is a Superpower

Exercise powers the body and mind

By Steve W

Every afternoon, come rain or shine, Eric would take off his work boots, push on some battered Nike trainers and scoot off for a good 45 minutes. When he returned Eric passed no opportunity to let us know that he had been for a “power walk” and was mentally and physically ready for the rest of the shift.

Eric described walking as his superpower. It clears the mind, gets the breath and blood flowing. His overriding message: Feeling in a bad mood? Escape for a walk.

Brisk walking is said to have more long lasting positive effects than anti depressants. when it comes to a choice between donning the trainers, stretching the legs and going round the block a few times, rather than shovelling in a pile of pills, I know what I’ll be choosing. Quite simply, going for a relaxing walk is a mood enhancing experience.

Escape in to a sensory experience

Try to hit all the points of a VAKGO approach, to enjoy a positive sensory experience:

  • See
  • Hear
  • Feel
  • Taste
  • Smell

Being stuck inside on a nice sunny day often seems counter productive to health. Business walks are a great way of mingling a meeting with some fresh air and clarity. Instead of sitting eating shortbread and guzzling coffee in a boardroam, why not hit the pavement and have a business walk?

While I would not suggest for a second that I am important enough to be having any business meetings, on this blog we are all about escaping and I’ve found walking around a park or hitting the pavements while talking to a friend, associate or client on the phone is extremely beneficial.

You can too. As long as you don’t become one of those annoying people making it obvious that you are in an important business meeting and start talking really loud like Dom Joly on Trigger Happy TV! Loud inhaler phone calls aside, soaking up the sun’s rays and receive some nourishing Vitamin D is always a bonus.

Escaping the office on a business walk
Escaping the office on a business walk

Look upwards when escaping on a walk

A few years ago I was listening to a podcast and they suggested looking up more when walking. Many of us look down, head bowed, hunched over in a mock funeral procession when we are walking.

Just by looking up we spot so many things we might otherwise have missed. Varieties of birds perched on houses or other interesting wildlife. The houses themselves, how they are strucured or the patterns chiselled in to the roofs, brickwork or chimneys of older buildings.

The patterns of the clouds, the skylines or people hanging out of high rise flats. Look up, head up, stretch back those shoulders and employ a good posture. Elevate your mood. Feel the ground, feel your feet moving and touching the pavement.

Escape physically and mentally with a nice walk. Go a different route, get lost, find your way home. It’s an exciting way to burn calories and clear the headspace. Exercise, as I’ve come to realise over the years, is as much of a mental boon as a physical one.

hedge and foliage in the countryside
Hedgerows are full of nature and food sources

I enjoy it and the dog enjoys. Why not take a rubbish bag along and collect all the crisp packets and tin cans strewn along the road? Where I live in the country there are often fast food wrappings, cans of beer or varieties of sweet packets tossed out into the fields and hedgerows of a morning. I encourage my children to bring some disposable gloves and a bin bag to collect up the “cleaner” waste.

Around this time of year as we leave the summer and head into autumn (or fall if you prefer) the blackberries are juicy and ripe to eat in many cases. Collect them up in a little plastic box, take them home, discard the bad ones, wash them thoroughly and use the blackberries for a nice jam or pie, or even mix it in with ice cream. You can’t beat a bit of foraging, but make sure you don’t munch on anything you are unsure about.

blackberries on a bush
Fresh blackberries are prime foraging material

There’s is so much to see and do outside, to collect, to observe, to eat or to admire. Get the boots on and stretch those calves! There are few things as relaxing and simplistic as an escape into nature. That’s why walking is my superpower.

Thanks for reading. If you found some value please leave a COMMENT or SHARE with others who might enjoy the article. Follow us @EscapersMedia

Categories
Lifestyle

Why I don’t want to work from home…

By Steve W

…but still ditch the office desk

Sitting in traffic is one of the most soul destroying daily practices. The clock ticks by, tensions rise, traffic reports warn of imminent blockages. It can often feel like you’re literally wasting your time.

For so long I dreamed of ditching the daily commute. No more waiting in line at the entrance to the motorway. No more “parking sweats” as the frantic search for a space intensifies. That was until my shift pattern suddenly changed and rather than aiming to be in the building for 9am, it became 7am.

No traffic concerns

Leaving home at 6 o’clock in the morning meant minimal traffic. The parking spaces were not filled as quickly. There was greater availability closer to the office building. An earlier start meant an earlier finish too; leaving midway through the afternoon, avoiding the rush hour.

Then the dreaded Corona Virus hit. It quickly became clear that we would be required to work from home. In the hrand scheme of things I’m one of the lucky ones: no reduction in pay, no furlough, no dreaded redundancy. Three months with no traffic concerns. A chance to test out whether working from home is really as appealing as I always suspected.

Motivated by freedom of movement

I swiftly settled in to a neat routine. Getting up early, daily exercise completed, nice breakfast cooked, home schooling out the way, logging on to the computer. It worked seamlessly for the first month. That was until it didn’t. Suddenly going in to the converted “office” with its infinite mess and dull lighting became a drag. It was like crawling in to a cave each day.

The lack of airflow added to sluggishness. The standard work was getting done, but all of those “extras” that I had added confidently to the list at the start of lockdown were not disappearing off the to-do and motivation was waning.

As we started getting drafted back in to a working environment -single days at first, increasing gradually as the months went on- I suddenly rediscovered a semblence of motivation. Getting back on the road, in to civilisation (no matter how weird or awkward with social distancing and face masks) felt invigorating. My productivity increased not only in work but in my personal endeavours to.

After thinking it through it wasn’t necessarily the fact that I had returned to my physical place of work that had allowed me to rediscover my motivation. The location was irrelevant. It was the freedom of movement that I found so motivating.

Working remotely is still an option

My long term ambition remains working remotely, in employment that does not require me to attend a specific location every day. However, working strictly from home, in a home office environment, did not work out well in the short space I tried it. I thought working from home would be great. Turns it wasn’t as liberating as I expected.

That said, being chained to a designated location is not the answer either. I’ve discovered I need a middle ground. The ability to pick and choose my spot for the day. Have laptop, wil travel. The cafe, the library, the coffee shop, the back of a car with a WiFi box – the choice of locations is endless. It may change each day, but the key point is the choice of location. Working as a Digital Nomad, picking my own times and spaces to work in are of more interest than strictly working from home.

It’s a shame that it took something like a pandemic for me to find this out. However, something we think in theory is the answer does not work out in reality. Maybe one day I’ll be sitting on a beach with alaptop somewhere, growing grapes by day and coding HTML by night? I still want to work from home, as long as “home” is flexible enough to move with me.